Announcements

Shapes and Sites of Transinstitutionalization

2018-02-21

In the parts of Turtle Island now known also as Canada, current discourses of transinstitutionalization impact Mad, Deaf[1], and Disabled peoples in different ways and in different contexts. For many, the practice of institutionalizing Mad, Deaf, and/or Disabled people is too often assumed to be obsolete; a past “treatment” approach rooted in outdated understandings of medical care and body/mind difference. Indeed many institutions that once confined Mad, Deaf, and/or Disabled people in Canada are closing or closed, organized around shorter-term stays. Yet, disabled people still experience institutionalization and institutional-style conditions in their daily lives. The persistence of these conditions in the lives of Mad, Deaf, and/or Disabled people is often referred to by Disability Studies scholars as transinstitutionalization.  

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Current Issue

Vol 8 No 1 (2019): Cripping the Arts in Canada

Disability arts are political. Disability arts are vital to the disabled people’s movement for how they imagine and perpetuate both new understandings of disability, Deafhood, and madness/Mad-identity and create new worldly arrangements that can hold, centre, and even desire such understandings. Critically led by disabled, mad, and Deaf people, disability art is a burgeoning artistic practice in Canada that takes the experience of disability as a creative entry point.

Published: 2019-02-27
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