Review of Berger, The Disarticulate: Language, Disability, and the Narratives of Modernity (2017).

Jennifer Janechek

Abstract


“[D]isability theory seems marked by an inability to mourn while trauma theory suffers from an inability to stop mourning” (11). With this powerful assertion, James Berger launches his critique of the disjuncture between disability studies and trauma studies in The Disarticulate: Language, Disability, and the Narratives of Modernity, a work that explores figurations of “dys-/disarticulation,” or failures of articulation that result in exclusion from the social-symbolic order, in modernist literature.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15353/cjds.v7i1.405

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The Canadian Journal of Disability Studies is Published by the Canadian Disability Studies Association-Association Canadienne des Études sur l'Incapacité, and is hosted and supported by the University of Waterloo.

ISSN 1929-9192 Canadian Journal of Disability Studies (Online)