Intersecting Oppressions: African Nova Scotians with Disabilities and Possibilities Arising from the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

  • Alexandra Giancarlo PhD candidate, Department of Geography, Queen’s University
  • David Shannon David W. Shannon C. M., O. Ont., LLM Barrister-and-Solicitor Executive Director, Hagi Community Services for Independence
  • Audrey Kobayashi
Keywords: Disability, Chronic disease, Nova Scotia, Human-rights, Race, African, CRPD

Abstract

Incorporating a social and critical model of disability with an eye to the important intersections of race, gender, income, and disability, we use the existing literature both on disability and on chronic disease and health within the African Nova Scotian community to argue that a human rights-based approach to disability, exemplified by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), provides the most promise for improving the lives of black Nova Scotians with disabilities.

 

Author Biographies

Alexandra Giancarlo, PhD candidate, Department of Geography, Queen’s University
Giancarlo is a PhD candidate in the Department of Geography at Queen's University. Her SSHRC-funded thesis research focuses on the cultural activism and racial politics of Louisiana's mixed-race rural Creoles. She also researches topics related to human rights, anti-racism, and disability studies.
David Shannon, David W. Shannon C. M., O. Ont., LLM Barrister-and-Solicitor Executive Director, Hagi Community Services for Independence
David W. Shannon C. M., O. Ont., LLM
Barrister-and-Solicitor
Executive Director, Hagi Community Services for Independence
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Articles