Designing Access Together: Surviving the Demand for Resilience

  • Esther Ignagni School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto
  • Eliza Chandler School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto
  • Kim Collins School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto
  • Andy Darby School of Computing and Communications Lancaster University, UK
  • Kirsty Liddiard School of Education and Institute for the Study of the Human University of Sheffield, UK

Abstract

Together we engaged in a project to co-design and co-create a fictional near-future world that would enable us to interrogate our present techno-social dilemmas.  Accessibility was central to our workshop for the way that access is always central to enacting crip, mad, Deaf, and spoonie[1] communities.  Without access, we cannot meet, discuss, share, struggle, fight, dismantle or create. Crucially, access was tied to our desire to co-create crip near-futures.

 

[1] The term spoonie refers to those who live with chronic conditions. Miserandino, C. (n.d.). Retrieved from: https://butyoudontlooksick.com/articles/written-by-christine/the-spoon-theory/

 

Author Biographies

Esther Ignagni, School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto

School of Disability Studies

Ryerson University, Toronto

Eliza Chandler, School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto

School of Disability Studies

Ryerson University, Toronto

Kim Collins, School of Disability Studies Ryerson University, Toronto

School of Disability Studies

Ryerson University, Toronto

Andy Darby, School of Computing and Communications Lancaster University, UK

School of Computing and Communications

 Lancaster University, UK

Kirsty Liddiard, School of Education and Institute for the Study of the Human University of Sheffield, UK

School of Education and Institute for the Study of the Human

 University of Sheffield, UK

Published
2019-07-01